World Art Dubai

On its fourth edition, the World Art Dubai, an affordable art fair was back. The four-day fair that kicked off on 18th April 2018 showcased well over 4000 pieces of art from over 200 exhibitors from 5 continents. Its focus is to present the work from resident and international artists to Dubai’s diverse international community. Some of our members presented their work at the fair in close partnership with Dubai-based Create Hub Gallery.

 

On booth F18, Create Hub hung works of Maina Boniface, Lincoln Mwangi, Michael Musyoka and Peteros Ndunde. Side by side with our artists, the gallery also included works of Kenyan based artist Patti Endo and Mozambique’s  Gonçalo Mabunda. The artists shared a myriad of perspectives on social-economical, political and identity related issues.

Michael's "Dreaming About Canaan" and "Dowry negotiations."

Michael has been observing exchanges of both material and immaterial possessions between humans for the past 2 years. An obsession that has brought about his series of works, dubbed “Quid Pro Quo”, that looks to investigate the circumstances that prompt these exchanges and the terms and conditions attached therein.

“The dyptich ‘Dreaming About Canaan’ is an imagination of what the Kenyan electorate gets in exchange for their vote. The politicians in their manifestos always promise to deliver a heaven equivalent to the bibilical Canaan: the promised land filled with milk and honey. In the two panelled painting,  I try to capture the moment the electorate imagines what a land filled with milk and honey means to them, according to the things they need the most: peace and love.” Michael

"Flowers, and butterflies are representations of beautifully crafted desires, that give birth to rope. An element of inevitable entanglement..."

Lincoln presented work that breaks down his view on how identity-fueled desire works in humans. He sees it as a mask that conceals one’s true wishes, worn in secret by individuals in the society. It kicks off as a beautiful fantasy, grows to be an everyday part of one’s life, then eventually entangles one tightly to its dark side.

“Flowers, and butterflies are representations of beautifully crafted desires, that give birth to rope. An element of inevitable entanglement that desire comes with. This unfolds to dark consequences that complement the beauty of the process. The bees and thorns of flowers that sting and prick mercilessly. Rope that tightly binds us to the dark side of our very desires. Until we grow numb to it, becoming our everyday life, as is nature itself.” Lincoln

Part of Maina's series "Burdens of being"

Maina’s body of work (Burdens of being) is a conversational series tackling the different ways of how today’s living standards have been set. Grey tones, lines and shapes are used as emphasis to the burdens with figures twisting and in some cases blocked to bring out the message of each piece.

"Grey tones, lines and shapes are used as emphasis to the burdens..."

Peteros dives into the details of fear and its hues. How they hold potential to inhibit one’s endeavors, to providing a platform for one to soar high enough to attain set goals. In a twist, he also sees the possibility of one taming fear to do one’s bidding, be it a sense of inhibition, soaring or a mix of the two, provided the fear molds the final outcome one intends.

"We drown in fear to extents of inability to react to matters."

“We drown in fear to extents of inability to react to matters. We drown in it then resort to flee. All in an effort to not only react to our natural stimuli, but also react tactically to avoid incumbent dangers. This, at the price of never living or experiencing to the fullest.” Peteros.

The fair provided more than just the classic fair exhibit, commonly riddled with artworks and installations. It extended its wingspan to accommodate a myriad of activities, ranging from virtual reality art to art talks. From creative workshops and photographers’ Instameet to live painting.

 

 

 

 

photos courtesy of Create Hub Galley and Brush Tu.

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